New: Live video sessions from Collections Learning

Yesterday, for the first time in 10 months, I heard school children's voices.  Not my own kids - I hear them all the time - but an actual group in a classroom!  Normally, Eton College Collections runs a primary programme of ten different sessions across its three museums. Topics include the Victorians, animals and the Stone Age, among others. During... Continue Reading →

String figure with beaded hair

First Intermediate Period 2160-2055 BCE, Textile, glass, H. 8 cm, W. 3 cm, D. 2 cm (ECM.1843-2010) This charming figure is made of fine thread knotted into bundles and wrapped around bunches of thicker string. The body is wrapped in sections, with separate bundles of thread used for the legs, arms, torso, and head. The... Continue Reading →

Figure of an Ibis

The ibis was one manifestation of Thoth, the god associated with divine knowledge and writing. Late Period - Ptolemaic Period 664-30 BCE, Copper alloy, travertine and gold, H. 3.5 cm, W. 3 cm, D. 1 cm (ECM.1692-2010) The breed of ibis specifically sacred to Thoth is the African sacred ibis (Threskiornis aethiopicus) which became extinct... Continue Reading →

Thoth and the African Sacred Ibis

In ancient Egypt, the ibis was one manifestation of Thoth, the god associated with divine knowledge and writing. The breed of ibis specifically sacred to Thoth is the African Sacred Ibis (Threskiornis aethiopicus) which became extinct in Egypt in the mid-19th century. This species has a white body, here represented by travertine, and a black... Continue Reading →

Message on a Chalice

One of the most striking exhibits in the Eton College Museum of Antiquities is this remarkable drinking vessel, made in the form of a partially-opened lotus flower. Blue glazed faience chalice in form of half-open lotus flower, with relief showing king smiting a kneeling captive. 21st dynasty, c. 1075-944BC. Eton College Museum of Antiquities. Photo:... Continue Reading →

Funerary Objects and Afterlife in Egypt

The Egyptians believed that the afterlife was a mirror-image of life on earth. They thought the soul lived on within the body & would continue to need familiar things. They hoped to be reanimated after death & do all the things they could do while they were alive. Shabti dolls were funerary figures who accompanied the... Continue Reading →

Feeding the Oryxes

Travel to Ancient Egypt in this Antiquities double-bill, where we explore the ancient world through selected objects in the Museum of Antiquities and in the exhibition Ancient Beings.

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