#ColorOurCollections

Now more than ever, we could all do with some relaxation. If you need a calming, mindful activity, Eton College Collections might be able to help! 

Launched in 2016, Color Our Collections is an annual event hosted by the New York Academy of Medicine. Libraries, archives and museums around the world turn materials from their collections into colouring sheets and books which can be downloaded for free, coloured in and then shared on social media. This year more than a hundred institutions have submitted colouring books, and Eton College Library is one of them. 

Our submission uses woodcut illustrations drawn from Konrad Lykosthenes’s  Prodigiorum ac ostentorum chronicon (Gc.3.20). 

https://catalogue.etoncollege.com/B48760

Image: Dürer’s rhinoceros in Konrad Lykosthenes, Prodigiorum ac ostentorum chronicon, Basel, 1557 (Gc.3.20). 

 

Lykosthenes’ compendium of exotic animals and strange natural events, packed with woodcuts, was published in 1557. German painter Albrecht Dürer produced the famous woodcut of a rhinoceros; though he had never seen the animal, his woodcut was hugely influential and was accepted as an accurate representation well into the eighteenth century.  

Download our colouring book here, or find it and others on the ColorOurCollections website.

By Hannah Smith, Assistant Librarian

Make sure to share your colouring using the hashtag #ColorOurCollectionsEton! 

Eton College Library is also celebrating World Book Day on 4th March 2021

This charming manuscript [France, ca. 1910], made on paper re-used from a child’s exercise book, is an example of a story written by a child for a child. Download the colouring book below to colour in your own version.

The author, known only as “S.T.” or “Monette” (presumably Simonette), wrote and illustrated it to be read out as a bedtime story for her little brother while she was at boarding school. It contains the adventures of a trouble-prone young rat whose parents, Monsieur and Madame Douxpoil (“Soft-fur”) send him to the seaside to recover from measles.

By Laura Carnelos, Library Curator


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